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  • By Craig Lewis You’re Crazy Volume One compiles twenty-five first-hand accounts of people from the punk scene who live with mental health struggle, addiction and trauma. This volume also includes two stories of punk rockers who are allies to those of us who struggle and their experience. This book exists to help empower the writers who are sharing their personal experiences so that they can be better understood. It also exists to help show that we are not alone in this world and that life can get better. It’s a necessity in our community. We all deserve to be heard. You’re Crazy aims to help decrease the stigma that the authors, and those like them, face while dealing with mental health struggle, addiction and trauma. By sharing their stories they are putting themselves on the line as they take ownership of their lives and experiences while demonstrating the reality of their lives. These stories educate and inspire, increasing understanding and empathy while reducing stigma.
  • Hearing Voices that are Distressing: A Simulated Training Experience and Self-Help Strategies

    Just as rehabilitation students gain insight into the experience of physical disability by using wheelchairs, so too can mental health professionals and students experience a simulation of some of the challenges facing people with psychiatric disabilities. Who should attend this training? This training has been developed and piloted for a wide range of people including: inpatient/outpatient psychiatric nurses, psychiatrists, social workers and psychologists; direct care workers in residential, day treatment and psychosocial rehabilitation programs; mental health administrators and policy makers; family members and friends; and academic faculty and students. A modified version of this training emphasizing self help skill building (and no simulation experience) is available for voice hearers who want to learn to control or eliminate distressing voices. Hearing voices that are distressing is a training in which participants use headphones for listening to a specially designed audiotape. During this simulated experience of hearing voices, participants undertake a series of tasks including social interaction in the community, a psychiatric interview, cognitive testing, and an activities group in a mock day treatment program. The simulation experience is followed by a debriefing and discussion period. The workshop also includes:
    • A lecture exploring the research and literature on hearing distressing voices
    • Presentation of self-help strategies for coping with or eliminating distressing voices
    • Practice exercises where participants learn to teach self-help skills to voice hearer
    Learning goals for this workshop:
    • To empathize more deeply with the challenges voice hearers face
    • To reduce the fear and stigma surrounding the voice hearing experience
    • To learn to teach self help skills to voice hearers
    Arranging a workshop for your group: Workshops can be tailored to meet your organization's needs. It is suggested that not more than 40 people be trained at one time.

    Call the National Empowerment Center at 1-800-769-3728 for more information

  • The current-day mental health system has been shaped around the idea that people who have been given psychiatric labels suffer in a way over which they have no control and that often results in an inability to care for ones self. It is an approach that encourages the idea that professionals need to step in to be the experts and determine someone's human potential. These beliefs have also influenced other aspects of our culture to the point where news, movies, friends and family tend to perpetuate the message that we are chronically sick and need to re-adjust our hopes and dreams. In some instances, people have been told they won't be able to handle living on their own, going to school, working, getting married or having children. Many have been told they need to take medications, even if they leave them numb, and participate in programs that treat them as if they are children. The Virtues of Non-Compliance talks back to all those ideas in the voice of people who have been there, who have been told they can't, and who have gone on to live their lives on their own terms.  
  • By Daniel Fisher, MD, PhD, Judi Chamberlin

     

    Training for peer coaches, family members and providers.

    "Recovery through Peer Support" is a curriculum for consumers in training to become peer coaches, for consumers wishing to further their own recovery, for family members, and those wanting to assist another person in their development as a whole human being while learning new skills for promoting recovery. The curriculum describes the evolution of peer support by mental health consumers, gives concrete suggestions of ways to facilitate recovery by using the 10 major principles of recovery developed by NEC, and contains interviews with peer coaches describing their experiences. Written by authors with decades of experience in peer support and consumer movement.  
  • By Amy Long, LPN, Daniel Fisher, MD, PhD

    Recovery through Peer Providers is an invaluable tool for health care purchasers, managed care organizations, behavioral health care providers, and mental health consumers. Promote recovery by inspiring hope, improving communication, building peer support, highlighting positive role models and sharing coping strategies.  
  • Purchase the complete Recovery Series for the combined price of $149.

    Includes one each of the following:
    • PACE/Recovery Curriculum - $49.00
    • PACE/Recovery through Peer Support Curriculum  - $69.00
    • PACE/Recovery through Peer Providers - $29.00
    • PACE/Recovery Reader - $30.00

    $177.00 If priced separately

  • Printed version of the PACE manual.

    Also available in PDF format via the home page of NEC website. Available in English, Spanish and Japanese Japanese Translation by: RACA - Recovery Alternative Change Association  
  • By Laurie Ahern, Daniel Fisher, MD PhD

    People can and do recover from severe emotional distress known as "mental illness".

    This curriculum has been developed by Laurie Ahern and Dan Fisher MD, Ph.D. It includes a 34-page guide and a 90-minute video lecture on the PACE (Personal Assistance in Community Existence) curriculum, featuring information on the empowerment model of recovery, PACE/Recovery principles, and recovery research. This information is useful for administrators, consumers, families, advocates, and providers who want to transform their system to one based on a recovery culture.  
  • Research studies, articles and book excerpts on recovery. All compiled into one publication!

    This publication dispels the myth that people labeled with mental illness need to lead lives of endless desperation and broken dreams. Inspire a new generation of consumers, caregivers, administrators, and families!
  • By Daniel Mackler

    In the far north of Finland, a stone's throw from the Arctic Circle, a group of innovative family therapists converted the area's traditional mental health system, which once boasted some of Europe's poorest outcomes for schizophrenia, into one that now gets the best statistical results in the world for first-break psychosis. They call their approach Open Dialogue. Their principles, though radical in this day and age of multi-drug cocktails and involuntary hospitalizations, are surprisingly simple. They meet clients in crisis immediately and often daily until the crises are resolved. They avoid hospitalization and its consequential stigma, preferring to meet in the homes of those seeking their services. And, perhaps most controversially, they avoid the use of anti-psychotic medication wherever possible. They also work in groups, because they view psychosis as a problem involving relationships. They include in the treatment process the families and social networks of those seeking their help, and their clinicians work in teams, not as isolated, sole practitioners. Additionally, their whole approach values of the voice of everyone in the process, most especially the person directly in crisis. And finally, they provide their services, which operate within the context of Finnish socialized medicine, for free. Open Dialogue weaves together interviews with psychiatrists, psychologists, nurses, and journalists to create both a powerful vision of medication-free recovery and a hard-hitting critique of traditional psychiatry.
  • By Judi Chamberlin

    On Our Own is Judi's story as a patient in both public and private hospitals.  The story explores her experiences while being a patient as well as the lessons she learned while using services controlled by the patients themselves.  It makes a compelling case for patient controlled services; a real alternative to the institutions that destroy the confident independence of so many.  This is a work of great hope and optimism. On Our Own is now translated in to Korean, thanks to Ji-Eun Lee.  To download the Korean version, please click here.
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